Haliburton Sculpture Forest Artists


2009 Artist Blacksmith Certificate Students

Name of Sculpture: 364 Day Tree
Materials: Iron
Description: The tree's branches hold ironworks sculpted by each student
Location: Haliburton Sculpture Forest; Beside Kiosk in Parking Lot for Fleming College
Installation Date: December, 2009

Number on Map: X

About the Sculpture
This space is designated for temporary exhibits to showcase Fleming College Student works. This piece was created by the 2009 Artist Blacksmith Certificate. This course is a 15 weeks intensive offered at the Haliburton School of the Arts - the Haliburton Campus of Fleming College. Each student made an individual peice on the tree and tree was a collaborative piece of work. The student`s names are listed on a plaque on the tree. 

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Haliburton Highlands Secondary School Students 2002

Haliburton Highlands Secondary School with support from Mary Anne Barkhouse and Michael Belmore
Name of Sculpture: The Beaver
Materials: Cement and Aluminum Lamp Post
Description: The beaver contemplates a lamp post
Installation Date: August, 2002

Number on Map: 6

About the Work
In the winter of 2002, the Haliburton Sculpture Forest contracted with the artists Mary Anne Barkhouse and Michael Belmore to be artists-in-residence in the Haliburton Highlands Secondary School and work with the senior art students. Michael and Mary Anne worked with the students in the winter and spring, teaching the process of creating public sculpture – from concept to drawings to models to creating the sculpture out of clay to making a plaster cast to casting the sculpture in cement to installation. The lamp post was donated to the students for their sculpture by the Municipality of Minden Hills who were replacing their lamp posts on the main street of Minden.

About the Artist: Mary Anne Barkhouse
Mary Anne Barkhouse was born in 1961 in Vancouver, BC. She belongs to the Nimpkish band, Kwakiutl First Nation and is a descendant of a long line of internationally recognized artists which includes Ellen Neel, Mungo Martin and Charlie James. She graduated with Honours from the Ontario College of Art in Toronto and has exhibited widely across Canada. Barkhouse works in various media such as sculpture, photography and jewellery. Her work examines environmental concerns and indigenous culture through the use of animal imagery - wolves, ravens, moose and beaver are juxtaposed against a diversity of background situations. A member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Art, Barkhouse’s work can be found in the collections of the Art Bank of the Canada Council for the Arts, UBC Musuem of Anthropology, Banff Centre for the Arts and the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs. In addition she has public art installations at Thunder Bay Art Gallery, University of Western Ontario in London, McMichael Canadian Art Collection and the Millennium Walkway in Peterborough, Ontario. Mary Anne currently resides in the Haliburton Highlands in Ontario.

About the Artist: Michael Belmore
Michael Belmore was born in 1971 north of Thunder Bay and graduated with an A.O.C.A. in Sculpture/Installation from the Ontario College of Art in Toronto, Ontario in 1994. Belmore is of Ojibway heritage and currently lives in the Haliburton Highlands in Ontario.

Since graduating from the Ontario College of Art Belmore has worked in a variety of media including plastics, metal, wood and photography. The materials used are an important key to understanding his work and bring into account how we view nature as commodity. For several years his work has evolved around our use of technology and how it has affected our relationship to the environment.

Previous exhibitions have included First Nations Art at the Woodland Cultural Centre, Brantford, Ontario (1992), Naked State at the Power Plant Comtemporary Art Gallery at Harbourfront, Toronto, Ontario(1994), Staking Land Claims at the Walter Phillips Gallery, Banff, Alberta (1997), lichen at the Toronto Sculpture Garden (1998), Ravens Wait at the Indian Art Centre in Hull, Quebec(1999) and Vantage Point at the Sacred Circle Art Gallery, Seattle, Washington (2002). As well Belmore has shown with several artist-run-centres and collectives across Canada and created site-specific public art installations for Thunder Bay Art Gallery, University of Western Ontario in London as well as for the City of Peterborough.

A member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, Belmore’s work is represented in the permanent collections of the Indian Art Centre in Hull, the McMichael Canadian Art Collection in Kleinberg, Thunder Bay Art Gallery, Agnes Etherington Art Gallery in Kingston, and in numerous private collections.

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Mary Anne Barkhouse

Name of Sculpture: Gelert
Materials: Bronze with patina tarnish
Description: Bronze sculpture of an Irish Wolfhound inspired by the Welsh legend of Gelert and Prince Llywelyn
Location: Haliburton Sculpture Forest; North trail, looking out over the field
Installation Date: August, 2011

Number on Map: 21

About the Sculpture 
Gelert is a hamlet in Snowdon Township in Haliburton County named after the town of Beddgelert in Snowdonia in the north of Wales. Beddgelert (grave of Gelert) is best known for its association with the legend of Gelert, the faithful wolfhound of Prince Llywelyn, the last prince of an independent Wales.

The Legend of Gelert. 
In the 13th century, Llywelyn, prince of North Wales, had a faithful wolfhound named Gelert that went every where with him. One day he went hunting without Gelert, leaving him to guard over his infant son. On Llywelyn's return, the dog ran out to greet his master, but Llwelyn saw that Gelert was stained and smeared with blood. The prince was alarmed and ran into his hunting lodge to look for his son. He found the infant's cot empty, the bedclothes and floor covered with blood. The frantic father plunged his sword into the dog's side thinking that Gelert had killed his son. The dog's dying  cry was answered by a child's cry. Llywelyn searched the lodge and found his boy unharmed but nearby lay the body of a large wolf which Gelert had slain. The prince, filled with remorse is said never to have smiled again. He buried Gelert under cairn of stones. That spot and the town that grew around it is called Beddgelert. – the grave of Gelert.

The bronze sculpture, "Gelert " stands at the watch on a hillside in Glebe Park.

About the Artist
Mary Anne Barkhouse, born in Vancouver BC., belongs to the Nimpkish band, Kwakiut First Nation. Now resident of Haliburton County, she exhibits across Canada and in the USA. Working with sculptures and installations, Mary Anne examines environmental concerns and indigenous culture through the use of animal imagery. Her work can be found in many collections including, the National Gallery of Canada, Art Bank of the Canada Council for the Arts, UBC Museum of Anthropology, the Macdonald Stewart Art Centre, McMichael Canadian Art Collection and Banff Centre for the Arts. In addition she has numerous public installations including the University of Western Ontario and the Millennium Walkway in Peterborough. 

The Making of Gelert
The following links lead to videos that were made by Highlands Media Arts recording the creation and installation of Gelert. Click on the title and watch the video.

1. The Donor

2. The Fable

3. The Vision

4. The Process

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John Beachli

Name of Sculpture: To Cut or Not to Cut
Materials: Local Granite
Description: Father and son having a conversation over the stump of a recently felled tree.
Installation Date: August, 2006

Number on Map: 15

About the Sculpture
Haliburton County has a long history of men working in the forest, in logging camps—such those run by Mossom Boyd—or cutting timber on their own land and also a history of sons learning skills from their fathers as they helped them with their work. This sculpture, carved out of local stone recovered from rock blasted from the Pre-Cambrian shield at a nearby building site, tells the story of a man and his son having a conversation over the stump of a tree that has just been felled. “To Cut or Not to Cut” is about the conversations that occur when a son is working with his father. It is also a representation of the never-ending push and pull of our relationship with the forest. We need the timber for building shelter, for heat, for a thousand different reasons; we also need the forests to conserve our environment, to protect our water, to provide habitat and to purify the air. How do you decide what to cut and what not to cut?
 
About the Artist
John Beachli moved to Haliburton over thirty years ago and started a construction company. John did a lot of work with stone and became skilled at dry stone wall creation and began to teach these skills at the Haliburton School of The Arts. John was inspired by the work of George Pratt, a renowned stone sculptor and instructor at the school. (Pratt’s sculpture “Pan” is part of the Haliburton Sculpture Forest collection)  He began studying with George to learn the craft and art of stone carving and spent time over the years with George in his studio in Vancouver. John now dedicates most of his time to stone carving.
In July 2006, John was artist-in-residence at the Haliburton Sculpture Forest – working on this sculpture near the entrance to the Sculpture Forest and the Haliburton School of The Arts and inviting the public to visit and watch the work in progress. John donated the completed sculpture to the Sculpture Forest. It was installed on its current site in August 2006 and officially inducted on October 21, 2006.
Two of John’s dramatic sculptures can be seen at the entrance to the Haliburton Hospital.

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Darlene Bolahood

Name of Sculpture: Redwing Frond
Materials: Steel and Acrylic panels
Description: 14' feet high, curved metal spine pointing north, painted acrylic panels attached to top half of spine
Location: Haliburton Sculpture Forest; Western end of the South Trail
Installation Date: August, 2003

Number on Map: 9

Vision for Sculpture
The sculpture’s axis, from base to tip, is perfectly aligned: the compass needle pointing to the true north. The sun’s rays, at this latitude, find the lenses of the coloured panels, casting shadows that change with the skies. The streaks of pigment opaque on the transparent surfaces along with the overlapping edges of the panels create kaleidoscopic forms within these shapes.
The form is explosive red. Like transparent marble veined with golds, silvers and black, the leaf/feather/louver-paged panels reflect the flight of birds, growth of the forests and books of the art of learning. Catching the wind, changing frequencies, perhaps it will even posses a voice where it stands. Imagine the red of this leaf against the white of the snow, the red of this leaf opposing the brilliance of the new spring greens, softening into the aging dust of summer, and then disappearing into the famous autumn colours of the Haliburton Highlands.
The leaf for growth, the feather: mark of freedom and flight, the pages of the book: the freedom in self-knowledge… which marks the only absolute measure of success in the uncovering and unleashing of an artist’s soul.
I pay tribute to the land and the rock, sun, sky and wind and the school standing within that space.

About the Artist
Darlene Lazdins engages in many forms of visual communication through the arts. She completed her B.Sc. at the University of Toronto, focusing on organic chemistry and philosophy, then continued her studies in painting, drawing, sculpture and textile arts at the Banff School of Fine Arts, Sheridan College, and Fleming College. After working in industry as a designer/illustrator in fashion, costume, and textiles, she began to focus exclusively on her own studio work in mixed media painting and sculpture. In recent years she has become involved in the art of computer animation, developing programs and presentations for both private institutions, the industry; and Ontario colleges. She is currently program coordinator for Computer Animation at Durham College in Oshawa. Her work has been exhibited extensively in many public galleries.

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Brett Davis

Name of Sculpture: Guardians of the Forest
Materials: Bronze
Description: Symbollic figures cast in a bronze column, approximately 1.5 metres high
Location: Haliburton Sculpture Forest; Upper ski trail
Installation Date: June, 2004

Number on Map: 4

Vision for Sculpture
In the past, man has played a crucial role in the depletion of our forests and has endangered many animals, bird species and forest vegetation by clear cutting, pollution, and neglect. Over the years, numerous conservation programs have been designed and implemented to protect the animals, birds, and forest vegetation, through education, laws, and public awareness. We must play an active and optimistic role to help replenish and stabilize our environment. The “Guardians” are a combination of man and nature. Together they form an alliance that reminds us to harmonize with nature to help keep our eco system balanced and our environment clean and free from any intervention that may harm or destroy the future of our forests.

About the Artist
Brett Davis is a professional artist, who graduated with Honours in 1981 from Central Technical School 3 year Art Program. He has received several awards for his work, including one from the Colour and Form Society in Mississauga, Ontario. Brett’s artwork is featured in permanent collections across Ontario, and in the China Changchun World International Sculpture Park. He has been commissioned to produce artwork across China, U.S.A., England and Canada. Examples of Brett’s commissioned pieces include the Lester B. Pearson Award, which can be seen at the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto, Ontario, and the Citizen of the Year Award, which is located in the lobby of the Newmarket Town Hall. Brett Davis is a member of the Sculptors Society of Canada, and of the Canadian Association of Cultural Property (C.A.C.P.). He is currently enjoying Gallery Representation at the Robert Mede Gallery in Toronto, Ontario and Art Works in Vancouver, B.C. Brett teaches evening courses in Painting and Drawing and Art Welding at the Central Technical School in Toronto.

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Mary Ellen Farrow

Name of Sculpture: A Walk in the Woods in Haliburton
Materials: limestone and bronze
Description: Stylized hiker with broad rounded lines, holding a bronze cast of a maple leaf, 1.5 metres high
Installation Date: January, 2001

Number on Map: 12

About the Work
Mary Ellen sculpted “A Walk in the Woods in Haliburton”, at the studio of local sculptor John Beachli. The limestone and bronze piece stands 1.5 meters high and has been mounted on a granite base. The broad rounded lines conform to the natural character of the stone. The hiker, holding a bronze cast of a maple leaf , shows movement and emotion, but demands reaction. The contrast of the limestone to the summer forest creates a pleasant surprise as you approach it, but in winter blends in with a top hat and arm-full of snow.

Artist Statement
I work almost exclusively in stone using broad, rounded, rhythmic lines that conform to the natural character of the stones. My goal is to produce work that is tactile, shows movement and emotion, but demands reaction. The work should speak for itself without explanation or title, but be able to be interpreted by individuals in their own way. The challenge of working on large public sculpture is most rewarding. I enjoy the mental contest of finding the idea, relating the idea to the history and environment of the site and then bring the idea to fruition. My recent monumental sculptures have had an intricate bronze detail added to them to give them a distinct flavour and contrast beautifully with the smooth lines of the stones.

About the Artist:
Mary Ellen, a resident of Brampton, is a member of the Mississauga Sculpture studio and a familiar face here in Haliburton, as a student at the Haliburton School of The Arts. Mary Ellen Farrow was born in Mount Forest Ontario and am currently residing in Brampton Ontario. She has taken sculpture courses as Sheridan College, Haliburton School of Fine Arts and Ontario College of Art and Design. Mary Ellen has taught sculpture and stone carving at The Mississauga Sculpture Studio, Nielson Park Creative Centre in Etobicoke, CACY in Caledon, the Living Arts Centre in Mississauga and at Beaux-Arts in Brampton.

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Aaron Galbraith

Name of Sculpture: Spirit of the Wild
Materials: Locally quarried granite
Description: One of a kind dry stone bench made from locally quarried granite.
Location: Haliburton Sculpture Forest; South Trail beside the stairs
Installation Date: August, 2012

Number on Map: C

About the Bench 
Carole Finn, local artist and community booster, donated the dry stone bench in memory of her late husband Don. Measuring 7 feet by 3 feet, the granite top of the bench weighs 1,400 pounds, with the many smaller rocks weighing in at 4,500 pounds. In the centre of the bench there is a mossy stone collected from the Finn's farm.'Spirit of the Wild' took artist, Aaron Galbraith, 7 days to make.

About the Artist
Aaron Galbraith has been either living or vacationg in the Haliburton region his entire life. He spent many summers living at his grandfathers cottage in the small community of West Guilford, before moving to Haliburton at the age of 7. Aaron has remained in the Haliburton Highlands, except for a brief stint of living in Toronto to go to school. He holds a degree from Humber College in Landscape Design and Horticulture. For over 14 years, Galbraith has been doing landscape work in the Haliburton area, and has a passion for creating unique landscapes using all materials, though he specializes in natural stone work. Aaron got his start in stonework at Don and Carole Finn's home, where he worked their gardens.

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Ian LeBlance

Name of Sculpture: Shadow Caster
Materials: Steel
Location: At the foot of the walkway leading to the main entrance of the college
Installation Date: June, 2006

Number on Map: 18

About the Work
Shadow Caster is sculpture based on my joy of studying insects and fossils. It actually is a biomorphic shape based on bees and beehives and the fossil remains of a trilobite. This sculpture is made out of metal rod and has an articulating spine, creating cascading layers trapping pentagons and hexagons in shadows. Metal rod was used purposefully so that the viewer can look through it and constantly enjoy the ever-changing shadow.

About the Artist
 Ian LaBlance received his Bachelor of Art in Art Education in 2001 from Western Michigan University (WMU). During his time at WMU, in addition to studying art education, Ian explored his interest in sculpture by creating works in a variety of materials. He also assisted in installing and removing sculptures as part of the WMU’s campus Sculpture Tour. In 2004, Ian received his Master of Fine Arts in Sculpture from University of Wisconsin – Madison. During his time at Madison, he began to find his voice in large-scale outdoor sculpture and incorporating new media into his work. Ian has displayed his artwork in Madison, Wisconsin, LaCrosse, Wisconsin, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, Kalamazoo, Michigan, Toronto, Ontario, and Norfolk, Virginia. He also co-created a short film documenting one of his sculptures that was shown at the 2005 Imaginative Film Festival in Toronto. Ian is currently working and living in Chicago, Illinois as a metal fabricator/sculptor.
 

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William Lishman

Name of Sculpture: Kennisis - Horse and Rider
Materials: Mild Steel
Description: On permanent loan from Fleming College, donated by Janis Parker
Location: Close to the main entrance of Fleming College
Installation Date: October, 2008

Number on Map: 19

About the Work
The theme of Expo 86 in Vancouver was transportation and communications.  There were three plazas that focused on various forms of transportation; land, sea and air.  My concept won the commission for the centerpiece sculpture for the Land Transportation plaza.  My thoughts (inspired by Terry Fox and Steve Fonyo) were that muscle power has been the mainstay of our transportation in human history. Legs have carried humankind around the planet since our forbearers crawled from the sea, and who knows when we first started riding various animals. The horse more than any other animal has carried us for many millennia. The overall piece was comprised of many elements depicting the devolution of the wheel. It started at the bottom out of a traffic jam as if wheeled vehicles had been caught in some tornado-like blender, and were torn apart in an upward spiral of varying colours around a central cone to a height of 86 feet. The vehicle parts re-congealed into muscle powered transportation. A celebration of legs!  Aside from the wheeled vehicles at the bottom, it was comprised of 55 figures which gradually diminished in size as they spiraled skyward giving the piece a forced perspective and making it appear much higher than its 86 feet. The horse sculpture was in the second step down in scale, just a bit smaller than life size.  It represented the history of equestrian transportation depicting a North American aboriginal rider as one with the horse in mind and muscle.  The segments that are welded together to make the sculpture are off cuts from a metal stamping plant that made parts for General Motors in Oshawa. The overall piece was entitled Transcending the Traffic.  

The sculpture was purchased by Janis Parker and donated to Fleming College which has provided the sculpture on permanent loan to the Haliburton Sculpture Forest. Janis chose the name Kennisis, the name of a racehorse owned by Gary Vasey and Don Finn, to honour the Vasey and Finn families.

About the Artist
Artist, sculptor, filmmaker, author, art director, inventor, pilot, naturalist, entrepreneur. 

William Lishman is a versatile artist of world renown. His works over the past three decades include two award winning films and numerous works of public art, which include an 86-foot high central theme Sculpture for Expo ‘86 in Vancouver and  a 2700 square foot 21st century earth integrated dome home.  He and seven pieces of his sculpture star in the acclaimed 3D IMAX film the “Last Buffalo.”  Bill was one of the pioneers of ultralight flight in Canada and in 1988 became the first human to lead birds in formation. In 1993 he led the first experimental migration of geese from Ontario to Virginia, which was documented by ABC's 20/20.

Bill's autobiography was published and released by Crown Publishers and made number four on the bestseller list in Canada   loosely based on Bills life Columbia Pictures produced the hit feature film Fly Away Home released in the fall of 1996  

Bill has received numerous awards including the Odyssey of the Mind's prestigious Creativity Award, which he shares, with the likes of Walt Disney, Chuck Jones and NASA as well as Canadian Pilots and Owners Association’s highest award in general aviation. In September of 2000 Canadian Governor General Adrienne Clarkson bestowed the Meritorious Service Medal on Bill for his work with birds and bringing Honour to Canada. 

Over the past decade, while continuing his work as a Sculptor Bill has presided over Operation Migration the organization he co founded to carry out research in ultralight led bird Migration.  The Operation Migration team is currently working with the US Fish And Wild Life Service and several other organizations to restore a flock of Migratory Whooping Cranes to eastern North America.
 

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Kevin Lockau

Name of Sculpture: Dreaming Stones
Materials: Granite boulders
Description: a 2.75 metre "mystical totem", made from six boulders collected from around the region
Installation Date: January, 2001

Number on Map: 3

About the Work
Kevin chose granite boulders as the medium for his installation, “Dreaming Stones”, - a 2.75 meter "mystical totem", made from six boulders collected from around the region. At the base of the totem is a sleeping wolf or coyote. Also included are a pattern of concentric circles representing time and growth rings, leaves representing regeneration, life and economy, contour lines representing contour plowing, and the faces of pioneers. Perched above all - the Owl, symbol of wisdom, flight and change. Over time a patina of lichen will convey a feeling of age and accentuate the patterns. Visitors are welcome to feel the textural patterns and handle the same stone as the settlers did.

About the Artist
Kevin Lockau lives and works north of Bancroft. He is a glass
instructor at Sheridan College in Oakville and the Haliburton School of The Arts.
Kevin collects various sized stones on the shores of Lake Superior
and after carving the stone, combines stone and glasswork
together into sculptural pieces. He has exhibited across
Canada, the United States, and Europe.

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Susan Low-Beer

Name of Sculpture: Curled Figures
Materials: Cement
Description: Two curled figures mounted on a large boulder
Location: South Trail
Installation Date: October, 2003

Number on Map: 8

Vision for Sculpture:
The sculptures will be made from the same mould; the surface of each one will be altered to create the feeling of uniqueness Although these sculptures are essentially the same, their gestures and consequently their emotional content changes with each altered position.

About the Artist
Susan Low-Beer was born in Montreal, Quebec and studied at Mount Allison University, New Brunswick where she received her Bachelor of Fine Arts. She acquired a Master of Fine Arts degree at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan. In 1999, she received the Saidye Bronfman Award for Excellence in the Crafts, and in 2000 was inducted into the Royal Canadian Academy of the Arts. In 2001 she created an installation in the courtyard garden of the Burlington Art Centre, called “Rocksbreath”. In 2002, the pieces were shown at the Clay and Glass Gallery in Waterloo as an indoor installation and were called “Rocksbreath II, An Improvisation”. This year she had a solo show at the McClure Gallery in Montreal, called “Tools for Daily Living”. Plans are in the works to travel this show to many galleries in Canada. Susan’s work has been exhibited in numerous other solo exhibitions. It has also been shown in group exhibitions including Aspects of Figurative Ceramics at the Riley Hawk Gallery in Cleveland, Ohio, The International Exposition of Sculpture Objects and Function Art, in Chicago and New York City, Survivors in Search of a Voice: The Art of Courage, an exhibition that toured internationally and The Eighth Chunichi International Exhibition of Ceramic Art in Japan. She is represented in the collections of the Museum of Civilization, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, The National Museum of Modern Art, Japan, the Burlington Art Centre, the Art Gallery of Mississauga, and the Robert McLaughlin Gallery, as well as numberous private collections.

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John McKinnon

Name of Sculpture: Conspiracy of Ravens
Materials: Bronze and Steel
Description: A flock of ravens created out of fabricated and welded steel.
Location: Haliburton Sculpture Forest; Upper ski trail
Installation Date: July, 2012

Number on Map: 22

About the Sculpture
The commission for this sculpture was made possible through a generous donation from Noreen Blake.  Noreen and Bob Blake spent summers in the Haliburton Highlands for over 60 years. They watched the growth of the Haliburton School of The Arts and both took a wide range of courses throughout the years. Although Noreen did not call herself an artist, she created beautiful work in a wide variety of media throughout her life. She was active for many years as a volunteer with the Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery and served as the coordinator of their art rental shop. This involved travelling to meet artists and select work from their studios throughout southern Ontario. Noreen always tookan interest in the art scene in the Highlands and for a number of years served as a tour guide for the Sculpture Forest. Inspired by the donations of sculptures by individuals such as Janis Parker and Diana Ferguson, she decided it was her turn. She proposed a sculpture competition with the theme “Avian Fauna” (birds of the region). Fifty-five artists from five provinces and two states submitted 60 proposals. A jury whittled that number down to seven and then Noreen made the final selection.

The jury and Noreen loved the movement of the swooping birds of John’s proposed sculpture and the unique character of each raven. The title “A Conspiracy or Ravens” inspires the question, “What are they up to?” John’s impressive body of work of expressive outdoor metal sculptures gave everyone confidence that “A Conspiracy of Ravens” would be a wonderful addition to the Haliburton Sculpture Forest. Noreen lived to see the installation of the 'Conspiracy of Ravens" in the summer of 2012. Noreen in her 90th year in 2013.

About the Artist: John McKinnon
John has spent most of the past 40 years working in stone, bronze, steel, clay, concrete and mixed-media. John is known primarily as a sculptor, although he also expresses himself through other disciplines such as painting, printmaking, drawing and multi-media. Throughout his career he has endeavoured to play and experiment with whatever came his way. He feels that an idea that cannot be expressed with one media can be expressed well in another.

From time to time over the years he has worked in the commercial art business which has inspired some of his later artwork. In the past 12 years he has developed an interest in working in the ephemeral media of ice, snow and sand. The creation of these non-permanent works give him what he refers to as the Zen-Sculpting experience and have taken him to many exotic places around the world.

Teaching has been a great inspiration for John. In the early eighties he taught at David Thompson University in Nelson. From the mid eighties until now he has taught modern hard stone carving technique to Inuit carvers in many communities in the Canadian Arctic. During this period he also taught many courses in Sculpture at Fleming College’s Haliburton School of The Arts in Haliburton, Ontario.

John lives in Nelson, British Columbia. 

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Metalgenesis: Don Dickson and Amy Doolittle

Metalgenesis has two works in the Sculpture Forest: “Sound Vessel: Forest” and “Evolution”
Name of Sculpture: Evolution
Materials: Granite and steel
Description: One of a kind bench carved out of a large granite boulder extended by decorative metal painted red
Installation Date: August, 2003

Number on Map: A

About the Artists
Metalgenesis artist team Don Dickson and Amy Doolittle have a growing reputation in North America as the creators of sound sculptures and public art. Working from their studio in Mississauga Ontario their sculptural works have been commissioned for public spaces by such varied sites as District Court of Appeals, Dayton Beach, Florida; Town Hall Park, Osoyoos, British Columbia; University of Florida, Gainesville Florida; the City of Brampton Performing Arts Centre; the Richard and Annette Bloch Cancer Survivor Garden, Columbia, South Carolina; the Science and Engineering Building at University of North Florida, Jacksonville Florida and the Frank McKechnie Community Centre, Mississauga. Members of the Sculptors Society of Canada, Society of Canadian Artists, Colour and Form Society and the Metal Arts Guild they have won numerous awards for their work. Metalgenisis is represented by Shidoni Gallery in Sante Fe, New Mexico.

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Metalgenesis: Don Dickson and Amy Doolittle

Metalgenesis has two works in the Sculpture Forest: “Sound Vessel: Forest” and “Evolution”
Name of Sculpture: Sound Vessel Forest
Materials: Corten Steel Plate, stainless steel rods, etc
Description: Forest designs in a rectangular prism encasing sound rods
Location: Haliburton Sculpture Forest; Upper ski trail
Installation Date: August, 2003

Number on Map: 5

Artists 'Vision for Sculpture
Synonymous with the perception of “up north” is the image of trees. They are so numerous that one takes them for granted. Solid yet pliant, they are part of our horizons and landscapes. Like a tree that is still, yet filled with life, the vessel holds sound and, like a tree, is animated and given voice by the wind.

About the Artists
Metalgenisis artist team Don Dickson and Amy Doolittle have a growing reputation in North America as the creators of sound sculptures and public art. Working from their studio in Mississauga Ontario their sculptural works have been commissioned for public spaces by such varied sites as District Court of Appeals, Dayton Beach, Florida; Town Hall Park, Osoyoos, British Columbia; University of Florida, Gainesville Florida; the City of Brampton Performing Arts Centre; the Richard and Annette Bloch Cancer Survivor Garden, Columbia, South Carolina; the Science and Engineering Building at University of North Florida, Jacksonville Florida and the Frank McKechnie Community Centre, Mississauga. Members of the Sculptors Society of Canada, Society of Canadian Artists, Colour and Form Society and the Metal Arts Guild they have won numerous awards for their work. Metalgenisis is represented by Shidoni Gallery in Sante Fe, New Mexico.

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Jake Mol

Name of Sculpture: The Homesteaders
Materials: Wood and old farm implements and hardware
Description: Father, mother, child and dog created from old telephone poles and farm implements
Installation Date: June, 2004

Number on Map: 1

About the Sculpture
For many years Jake Mol has taught a watercolour painting course at the Haliburton School of The Arts. Each summer he brings his students out to paint pictures of the farmstead that is part of the Haliburton Highlands Museum in Glebe Park. Jake thought that there should be a sculpture that connected the farmstead to the Sculpture Forest and presented the Haliburton Sculpture Forest Committee with the concept for the Homesteaders. Using recycled materials—bits and pieces of tools and hardware that might have been found around a farmstead—Jake created a whimsical family that might have built and lived in the buildings across the way. The stand facing their “home” holding up paintings that reflect their past and the present.

About the Artist

Jake Mol first received public interest across North America in 1964 with a published portrait of J.F. Kennedy. Since going public in 1969 he has received many awards in juried shows, and by 2003 participated in over 60 solo/duo and numerous group shows. Jake is an elected member of the Canadian Society of Painters in Watercolour, a signature member of Toronto Watercolour Society, a charter member of the Vodka Painters of Canada and a member or associate member of numerous North American art societies. He is a respected and sought after painter, instructor and juror. He has taught at the Haliburton School of the Arts for many years. His charcoal portrait of Chief Joseph is displayed in the Crazy Horse Museum of South Dakota. Jake loves the outdoors, the Canadian Shield and worldwide scenes can be found in many of his on- location paintings. In addition to his long career as a painter. Jake has been working a series of whimsical sculptures made with reclaimed materials and old farm implements. His work “The Homesteaders”, which he has donated to the Haliburton Sculpture Forest brings together his work as a sculptor and a painter. Jake’s work can be found in many private and corporate collections in North and South America, Asia, Australia, and Europe. www.tamarackstudios.com

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Charles O'Neil

Name of Sculpture: Embracing Eos
Materials: Wire and Steel
Description: A male figure reaching for the sky
Location: Haliburton Sculpture Forest; Waterfront Trail
Installation Date: June, 2004

Number on Map: 13

About the Artist

Charles O'Neil is a full-time artist living and working in the Haliburton Highlands. With a background in classical life drawing and painting, Charles earned many awards for his painting in juried competitions during the 1980's. By the 1990's Charles became interested in three dimensional sculptures and moved into the use of metals. With some artist blacksmithing techniques Charles developed a method of creating sculptures of wire commonly found at most building supply companies. Although subject matter of his sculptures varies widely, the human form has always been his main interest. Relieving the arts should not be taken too seriously; Charles strives to include a touch of humour in his work. 

With a long association with the Haliburton School of the Arts, and Sir Sandford Flemming College, Charles earned a Visual and Creative Arts diploma and an Artist Blacksmith Certificate. He became a faculty member in 1997, teaching both teens and adults wire sculpture, drawing, and painting. Charles is also an active member of the Haliburton Guild of Fine Arts, the Ontario Crafts Council, and the Craft Association of British Columbia.

Charles O'Neil is presently showing his work in many galleries across Canada. His work can be found in galleries in Ottawa, Haliburton, Port Carling, Bracebridge, Toronto, and Vancouver. Acceptance of his work is international and is held in many private and corporate collections in New York, Southfield Michigan, London, England, Paris, France, Brisbane, Australia, and throughout Canada.

About the Sculpture

This sculpture depicts a man facing due east, with his arms raised high, greeting the moring sun and embracing the rosy-fingered goddess of the dawn, Eos. According to Greek mythology, Eos rose up into the sky from the river Okeanos at the start of each day, and with her rays of light dispersed the mists of the night. She was sometimes depicted riding a golden chariot drawn by winged horses, at other times she was shown borne aloft by her own pair of wings. Eos had an unquenchable desire for handsome young men, some say as the result of a curse laid upon her by the goddess Aphrodite.

The store of the man depicted in Embracing Eos is unlcear. Does he simply admire the beauty of Eos as she rises each morning? Was he one of her past lovers? Or is he another young man about to fall victim to her lust?

Being a sculpture of black steel and dark wire, Embracing Eos can be difficult to see in the evening twighlight. Some visitors have had such a difficulty spotting the sculpture that they believe is has disappeared. Perhaps the scultpure is just hard to see in the evening, or perhaps the man of metal does leave at night, only to reappeard in the morning to greet his seductive Eos. 

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Charles O'Neil

Name of Sculpture: Fire and Ice: A Really Big Shoe
Materials: Mild steel, Czech fire polished glass beads, faceted crystal glass beads, stainless steelwire
Description: A larger-than-life, two metre tall, red and crystal stiletto shoe
Installation Date: May, 2009

Number on Map: 20

About the Sculpture

A few years ago Charles O'Neil was displaying his work at the Buyers Market of America in Philadelphia, when his wire sculptures of animals and human figures caught the eye of world renowned shoe designer Stuart Weitzman. Weitzman, impressed with the sculptures, approached O’Neil and asked him to sculpt wire shoes for their corporate art collection. O’Neil was delighted to take on the challenge.

Designing a shoe sculpture for Weitzman added a new dimension to O’Neil's work. Aside from exposing his work to a broader audience, it also inspired him to create a series of shoe sculptures, adding glass beads to the wire structures. O’Neil's shoe sculptures turned many heads as they appeared in art shows and galleries across the Haliburton Highlands and Ontario.

When Barb Bolin retired as principal of Fleming College, Haliburton Campus, and the Haliburton School of The Arts in 2007, after 35 years with the College, her friends and coworkers donated to a fund to help buy a sculpture for the Forest in her honour. Bolin was asked to choose which artist would be commissioned to create the sculpture, and it wasn't long before her mind turned to Charles O’Neil and his brilliant shoes.

Bolin believed that O’Neil would be a good choice for many reasons. He had already contributed to the Sculpture Forest with his piece Standing Figure, which has delighted many visitors, so she knew his work would 'fit in' well. O’Neil also lives in the Highlands, and Bolin was interested in commissioning work from a local artist. She loved the fact that O’Neil's shoe sculptures are bright, bold, and colourful, and Bolin wanted to add an extra dash of colour to the Sculpture Forest.

O’Neil gladly accepted the commission, and began researching for the project. Deciding to create a shoe of grand proportions, and realizing that the sculpture would have to endure the harsh elements of the Highlands, he crafted his sculpture out of steel rods, stainless steel wiring, and large fire glazed glass beads from the Czech Republic and faceted clear beads from China.

Fire and Ice: A Really Big Shoe was installed in the Sculpture Forest in the spring of 2009.

 

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George Pratt

Pan…the spirit god of the fields and forests who comes through Greek mythology
Name of Sculpture: Pan
Materials: Salt and Pepper Granite
Description: A “larger than life” figure of Pan rests against a tree stump while he plays his pan pipes
Location: Haliburton Sculpture Forest; North trail, near the historic museum buildings
Installation Date: May, 2003

Number on Map: 2

About the Sculpture
One of Pan’s favourite sports was pursuing beautiful wood nymphs that strayed into the high forests where he lived. His strange, coarse goat-like features frightened the nymphs and they would flee in fear of him. From this we got the term “panic”. He was particularly smitten by one nymph whose name was Syrinx but she did not welcome his attentions. One day, being pursued by Pan, she came to the river. Exhausted, she beseeched the water nymphs to protect her. Just as Pan was about to grasp her, she was transformed into one of the many reeds that grew along the river bank. Frustrated, Pan plucked the reeds and fashioned them into the first flute. Since that day, he can be found playing sweet music on the flute which is the embodiment of his unrequited love. We have come to call his instrument the ‘pan-flute’ but more correctly, its name is Syrinx after Pan’s lost nymph.

This sculpture was carved out of an 8,700 Kg (19,300 Lbs) block. By the time the sculpture was completed, George had removed more than 3,000 Kg (7,000 Lbs) of stone, an impressive feat considering the work was done outdoors in blackfly season!

About the Artist
George Pratt is a professional stone sculptor who was initially introduced to the stone-carving arts by E.B. Cox in 1970. His works are carved in granite, marble, jade and other exotic ornamental stones of Canada. Having produced 25 annual shows beginning in 1972, his work is widely collected in North America by private individuals and corporations. Large works commissioned for public display include the Terry Fox Memorial, Coquitlam; the Sedna Sculpture, Toronto; The Builders, Calgary; and the Alaskan Veteran's Memorial. George has sculpted many presentation works for foreign dignitaries, notably HRH Prince Philip; the Honorable Mary Robinson, President, Republic of Ireland; the Honorable Kim Young Sam, President of the Republic of Korea; the Honorable Corazon Aquino, President of the Philippines; President Boris Yeltsin, Russia and President William Clinton of the United States. He also has extensive teaching experience. George grew up in Haliburton and graduated from the Haliburton Highlands Secondary School.

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Marianne Reim

Name of Sculpture: Terminus
Materials: Ľ inch rolled steel
Description: Stylized figure, painted black. 2 metres high
Installation Date: January, 2002

Number on Map: 11

Artist Statement
The specific forms of my work float on the surface of a well of memory. I create discreet objects, objects in series and installation. My preferred material is steel. In my constructions the material wears its identity through rough cut edges, visible welds and an undisguised slabness. I may combine them with wire, stone, text and miscellaneous findings. By cutting, burning and welding, experience, memory and emotion are melded into steel.

About the Artist
Marianne Reim (BA, SCA, SSC) graduated with a B.A. in Art & Art History from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. She has been Artist in Residence in Japan, Yugoslavia, Italy and British Columbia, Canada. She has had many solo exhibitions and participated in numerous group shows.

She exhibited her sculptures from 1994 to the present at such prestigious venues as: Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; Hamilton Art Gallery, Hamilton, Sculpture Society of Canada; Canadian Embassy, Tokyo; Gallery Fukashi, Matsumoto, Japan, Künstlerhaus, Ulm, Germany; Dante Centre, Ravenna, Italy; Crawford Arts Centre, St. Andrew Scotland, and at the Hong Kong Museum of Art, Hong Kong.

Her works can be found in public and private collections.

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Leo Sepa

Name of Sculpture: Moose Scraps
Materials: Collage of retired vintage farm and other hardware
Description: Found metal objects formed into the shape of the moose Height: 2 metres, length 2.5 metres
Installation Date: January, 2001

Number on Map: 10

About the Work
Found objects are at the heart of this sculpture, aptly titled "Moose Scraps", a collage of retired vintage farm and other hardware, formed into the shape of one of Canada's largest mammals, the moose. Like many of Leo’s sculptures, the 2.5 meter piece exudes wit and charm.

About the Artist
Leo’s foray into metal art began some thirty years ago. Though the urge to create with fire and metal remained strong throughout the years, Leo’s talents were relegated to weekends and holidays at his Haliburton cottage until he retired. In 1997, he and is wife Hilary fulfilled a longtime dream by establishing Iron Jive Studio in Moore Falls, Haliburton.

Leo is a participant of The Haliburton County Studio Tour, where art lovers watch him demonstrate forging techniques and visit his home gallery. Many of Leo’s ideas are conceived and captured on film during outings of rural Ontario, especially Haliburton. He is continually developing and exploring new ideas, which are reflected, in his artwork.

Leo’s paternal grandfather was a blacksmith in Estonia (in fact, the name “Sepa” is derived from the Estonian “Raud Sepp” which translates as iron smith). Like his grandfather, Leo uses traditional blacksmith techniques. But he also employs the use of an oxyacetylene torch, a Mig welder, a plasma cutter and various other modern tools. He works in both recycled and new materials where he sometimes uses natural patinas creating a wide variety of pieces. Though the elder Sepa was a traditional blacksmith, forging tools and farm implements, Leo figures a little of his grandfather’s craft rubbed off on him.

Leo was born in 1947 in Sweden after his Estonian parents fled to the nearby country to escape Soviet repression after the USSR invaded the Baltic. He came to Canada when he was three.

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Richard Shanks

Name of Sculpture: Visionary – A Tribute to Sir Sandford Fleming
Materials: Steel and bronze
Description: Surveyor's tripod incorporating symbols of time and direction
Installation Date: January, 2002

Number on Map: 7

About the Sculpture
The sculpture “Visionary” commemorates the life of Sir Sandford Fleming and his contributions to Canada and the world. Born in 1827 in Kirkcaldy, Scotland, Sandford Fleming arrived in this region, travelling by way of Quebec City and Montreal to Kingston, and continuing by boat to what he described as " a nice healthy little town", Cobourg. The 18-year-old Sandford and his older brother, David, arrived in Peterborough by horse-drawn cart on June 17 1845, where Sandford made his home with Dr. and Mrs. John Hutchison. Sandford Fleming contributed much to this area. His drawings and maps accurately depict the Peterborough area as it was in the mid-1800s, and his copious diaries provide enlightening detail. In turn, the Peterborough community enriched his life - his wife Jeannie Hall, whom he married in 1855, was a Peterborough native, and the daughter of Peterborough's sheriff. Fleming was always searching for broader horizons and greater challenges. His keen intelligence and scientific and artistic ability involved him in many significant accomplishments that included the establishment of Universal Standard Time, which he recommended to the Royal Canadian Institute in 1879, and which was adopted universally in 1884, the design of a prototype of an in-line skate, which he tested and pronounced "altogether satisfactory", at the age of 21, the foundation of the Royal Canadian Institute in Toronto in 1849, the design of Canada's first adhesive postage stamp, the Threepenny Beaver, in 1851, appointment as Chief Engineer of the Northern Railway in 1855, the proposal for a coast to coast railway line spanning "British North America" in 1858, and advocacy of a submarine cable which would link all the nations of the British Empire by telegraph. Pacific Cable was finally completed in 1902. In 1968 the new Community College in Peterborough was named after Sir Sandford Fleming. This sculpture includes the elements of a surveyor’s transit, the compass, time, significant dates in Fleming’s life and the globe.

About the Artist
Born in England, Richard is the son of a master stone mason who creates industrial masterpieces and functional designs in brick and stone. His mother was an artisan-craftsperson who appreciated beauty in a variety of found objects and nature. Richard’s sister has a similar talent which is being carried on today. As an adult, he his artistic desire led him into the restoration of vintage cars and the building of custom vehicles. In 1989, he married and moved to Nova Scotia where he transformed a century-old sawmill into a unique space, The Mill Gallery Art, Crafts & Curiosities, which was to exhibit their own works and those of local artists. In 1996, they returned to Ontario where Richard took this creativity further, building a studio suitable for the production of various materials including blacksmithing. Richard became a certified Artist Blacksmith in 1999 at Sir Sandford Fleming College in Haliburton. He now creates unique works of art, sculpture and furniture in a variety of media such as steel, stone, wood and glass. They operate, Just Mad Innovative Design—a family business, inspired by their children Justice and Madison who have give them guidance through their own creativity. Anything is Possible!

Sir Sandford Fleming

Born in 1827 in Kirkcaldy, Scotland, Sandford Fleming arrived in this region, travelling by way of Quebec City and Montreal to Kingston, and continuing by boat to what he described as " a nice healthy little town", Cobourg. The 18-year-old Sandford and his older brother, David, arrived in Peterborough by horse-drawn cart on June 17 1845, where Sandford made his home with Dr. and Mrs. John Hutchison.
Sandford Fleming contributed much to this area. His drawings and maps accurately depict the Peterborough area as it was in the mid-1800s, and his copious diaries provide enlightening detail. In turn, this community enriched his life - his wife Jeannie Hall, whom he married in 1855, was a Peterborough native, and the daughter of Peterborough's sheriff.

Fleming was always searching for broader horizons and greater challenges. His keen intelligence and scientific and artistic ability involved him in many significant accomplishments, which included:

  • Surveys and maps of the harbour of Toronto, the towns of Peterborough and Cobourg, and the Grand Trunk, Ontario, Simcoe and Huron railways.
  • Establishment of Universal Standard Time, which he recommended to the Royal Canadian Institute in 1879, and which was adopted universally in 1884.
  • The design of a prototype of an in-line skate, which he tested and pronounced "altogether satisfactory", at the age of 21.
  • Foundation of the Royal Canadian Institute in Toronto in 1849.
  • Design of Canada's first adhesive postage stamp, the Threepenny Beaver, in 1851.
  • Appointment as Chief Engineer of the Northern Railway in 1855.
  • Proposal for a coast to coast railway line spanning "British North America" in 1858.
  • Appointment as sole engineer to supervise the survey of the proposed Intercolonial Railway, linking the Maritime Provinces with Quebec.
  • Advocacy of iron railway bridges over wooden, for safety and durability.
  • Simultaneous supervision of the surveys of both the Intercolonial and Canadian Pacific Railway lines between 1872 and 1876.
  • Appointment as Chancellor of Queen's University in 1880. Fleming held this position for 35 years, until his death.
  • Appointment to the Board of Directors of Canadian Pacific. Fleming was present when Donald A. Smith drove in the "last spike" in 1885.
  • Companion of the Order of St. Michael and St. George in 1887.
  • Knighthood by Queen Victoria in 1897 as part of her Diamond jubilee celebrations.
  • Advocacy of a submarine cable which would link all the nations of the British Empire by telegraph. Pacific Cable was finally completed in 1902. Fleming had realized a lifelong dream.

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John Shaw-Rimmington

Name of Sculpture: C to C
Materials: Locally quarried granite
Description: Two inter-twined “C” shaped dry stone walls
Installation Date: May, 2007

Number on Map: 16

About the Sculpture
Almost 25 tons of stone purchased from Attia Quarries in Minden was used for the hands-on, week-long Dry Stone Structures course given May 2007 at the Haliburton School of the Arts. The finished structure was the latest addition to the Haliburton Sculpture Forest and represents the work of 12 capable students who came from as far away as Montana, Washington and Ottawa to attend this comprehensive dry stone wall workshop.
 
'C to C' is a free standing dry laid garden sculpture designed by DSWAC president John Shaw-Rimmington. It uses an attractive locally quarried random granite material carefully fitted together to form two semi-circular walls. The idea is based on taking a typical dry laid sheepfold (the type you see all over parts of Britain and Scotland) and then slicing it down the middle and shifting one side several feet along the line of bi-section. (Sort of a 'Sheep Shear'). In effect, a charming new structure is created presenting a winding pathway through two C shaped walls. The height of the two walls, including the vertical rugged coping, is nearly 4 and a half feet high; standing between them, there is a dynamic interior space which is intimate and inviting. We have called the dry laid structure "C to C" as it alludes not only to the different parts of North America that people came from to build the structure, but also the growing interest there is in traditional dry stone construction all over Canada and the States, from sea to sea.
 
About the Artist
John Shaw-Rimmington has, in the past, specialized in restoring historic stone buildings. After working for the Uxbridge museum he extended his focus to using stone in landscaping and building dry stone walls. His knowledge of designing with stone has developed after years of masonry practice and comprehensive research into traditional stonework in Britain, where he has worked with professional wallers and royal dykers to the Queen. He demonstrates walling in southern Ontario and has constructed several arches, Mason Hogue's being one. John undertook the ambitious project of building a stone bridge in Port Hope John is the president of the Dry Stone Wall Association of Canada (www.dswac.ca), which is endorsed by DSWA of Britain.

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John Shaw Rimmington

Name of Sculpture: The Unity Gate
Materials: Locally quarried granite
Description: Constructed by students of the 2013 Dry Stone Structures Course, Fleming College, Haliburton School of the Arts
Installation Date: August, 2013

Number on Map: 24

About the Sculpture
The Unity Gate is an archway and curling dry stone walls, made with locally quarried granite. It was designed by John Shaw-Rimmington and constructed by students of the 2013 Dry Stone Structures Course at Fleming College, Haliburton School of the Arts.

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Doug Stephens

Name of Sculpture: The Sleep of the Huntress
Materials: Belmont Rose Granite
Description: Woman sleeping in stone
Location: Haliburton Sculpture Forest; South end of Waterfront Trail
Installation Date: August, 2004

Number on Map: 14

Artist’s Vision for the Sculpture
Walking through the forest is, for me, a time of contemplation: of peace and reflection. I see the viewer coming upon a rock, a ruddy rock, fitting for this place but not of this place. It is rough hewn and gnarled. As they approach it becomes evident that they are not alone; that they have happened upon an elegant sleeping woman, lost in the deep world of dreams. She exists in a spiritual realm: out of time and immaterial. All is quiet except for the sounds of the woods. The viewer is held for a moment in silence: hesitant and reflective in the presence of this woman of nature, calmly nestled on her craggy bed.

About the Artist
Doug Stephens has been carving stone since taking a course in Haliburton in 1998. Years before he had worked in the set department for film and television and then went on to study sculpture in Halifax at the Nova Scotia School of Fine Art, but had not settled on a medium that had any real meaning for him. That changed when he studied in Haliburton with George Pratt, who then invited him to spend some months in Vancouver apprenticing at his studio. Later that year, Doug opened his own studio in Muskoka and has had his work shown in galleries in Bala, Gravenhurst, Rosseau and Haliburton. Every summer since then he has taught at the Haliburton School of The Arts. In May of 2001 he moved his studio to Belleville and began working as a full-time sculptor for the Campbell Monument Company, carving sculptures for the local and North American market.

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Phillip Vander Weg

Name of Sculpture: Shelter Shift
Materials: Wood, paint, hardware
Description: Brightly coloured 3D representation of a child's sketch of a house
Installation Date: July, 2007

Number on Map: 17

Artist’s Vision for the Sculpture
Shelter Shift 07.2007 is a continuation of the shelter shift series, which references a “house/shelter” icon form and the fact that little is at right angles; planes have shifted, or are askew. The intent is to both confuse what is three-dimensional or may be the illusion of three dimensionality, and in the process to create an intentional degree of ambiguity, a duality of real and perceived space. The simple form carries a number of possible associations with it: home, house, shelter, barn, shed, or cottage. Intense primary colors create a childlike reference, making the form playful, a welcoming space to visit. The actual physical openness of the structure further entices viewers to enter the structure and engage directly with the space. The cumulative effect sparks the imagination of participants to create personal narratives and memories. Shelter Shift 07.2007 is deliberately situated to blend with the forest, while affording excellent viewing of neighboring works. Shelter Shift 07.2007 is also differentiated from others in the series with the inclusion of a rock foundation and native stone transitional elements.
The smaller works have an intimacy about them and allow for dynamics to be explored with various grouping arrangements not possible with the larger pieces. Color interaction, texture, contrasts and similarities are endless avenues for investigation and visual reward.

About the Artist
Phillip Vander Weg is a professor of Art at Western Michigan University. He has held that post since 1989 and has been chair of the Department of Art for most of that time Vander Weg is also director of the WMU Sculpture Tour Program, which he founded in 1991. He received his MFA in Sculpture from The University of Michigan’s Horace Rackham School of Graduate Studies in 1968. He also has a BS in Design from The University of Michigan.
As an artist, Vander Weg has been exhibited regularly since 1969. Venues include Frederick Meijer Sculpture Park and Gardens in Grand Rapids, Cleveland State College, The University of Tennessee, Clemson University, and The Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem, N.C. Awards and honors include a Purchase Award at The 1996 Allegro Festival Exhibition, winner of The Vanderbilt University Sculpture Competition for Heard Library Interior in 1986, and a Purchase Award in the Art Of The Eighties competition at The Tennessee State Museum (Nashville) in 1982.
Since 1972, he has had in excess of 25 private commissions (completed) of major sculptures for clients in the Midwest and Southeast, and his works are in the public and corporate collections of, among many others, The Butler Museum of Art, Tennessee State Museum, New York State University at Potsdam, and Gulf & Western Industries in New York City. He is an active member of The National Association of Schools of Art and Design, The College Art Association, FATE: Foundations in Art: Theory and Education, and The International Sculpture Conference.

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Peter Wehrspann

Name of Sculpture: Current
Materials: Oak and Steel
Description: One of a kind bench, a reverse ‘S' curve created from 4” slats of oak with steel legs
Installation Date: August, 2005

Number on Map: B

Vision for the Bench
I designed this bench with two major considerations in mind. The sinuous form is for a pleasing shape embodying flow and movement. While the human-manipulated materials that make up the bench contrast with the surrounding natural environment, the bench's repetition of line and sense of movement invokes a congruent relationship with its environment. The concave face of the bench allows for interaction between visitors to the Sculpture Forest. Passers-by taking a rest will be nudged to engage in a quiet chat or conversation. Though, respecting the needs for personal space the bench's undulating form also allows for a convex seating arrangement to provoke focus elsewhere. A low backrest makes it easy to rest one's elbows to sit for long periods to just observe, communicate, or a combination of both.

Artist Statement
I take great pride in creating unique objects that successfully fulfill requirements of form and function. This project became more intriguing for two reasons. First the bench is an exterior object that posed challenges in the design and construction and aesthetics. I don't believe it is a casual duty when attempting to gracefully impose human-made objects into nature. Second, the project was one that, unlike other sculpture, involves interaction with people on an ongoing basis. It is my belief that 'good objects' can positively evoke emotion and interaction, personally and interpersonally. Artists before me have inspired these perspectives that now define my work. Natural artist Andy Goldsworthy from England, landscape architect Martha Schwartz from the U.S.A. and Christopher Alexander, author of "A Patterned Language", all promote an awareness of the integral relationship between us, the Earth, and the things we, as humans, make.

About the Artist
Peter is a skilled designer, metal artist and wood worker. A graduate of SITAL, he has twice received the Betty Kantor Scholarship Award for students who display excellence in the program. Before studying furniture design, Peter received a degree in Communications from Wilfrid Laurier University. Born in Toronto, he has been able to widen his perspective by traveling and living abroad in Japan, Switzerland, and Denmark. Peter has also studied design in Denmark where his work was exhibited at the prestigious Denmark Design Skole. His work has been exhibited online, in print media, and at Fluid Living, Distillery District location. Peter is energetically involved in the Toronto craft and design community, most recently is his involvement with Designers Walk Home and Style Studio Tour where his work is displayed at Weavers Art. In the time of his young career, Peter has been developing working relationships with residential clients, interior designers, and architects. info@holtzundmetal.com

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Haliburton Sculpture Forest